Millage Levy Proposal

Ballot Language

GRAND RAPIDS CITY CHARTER AMENDMENT AUTHORIZING A TAX LEVY OF 0.3741 MILLS FOR TWENTY YEARS TO BE USED FOR PUBLIC LIBRARY PURPOSES

 

It is proposed Section 18(e)(3) be added to the City Charter authorizing the levy of 0.3741 mills (one mill equals a levy of $1.00 for each $1,000 of taxable value) for twenty years, 2018 through 2037, to be used for operations, maintenance, repairs and capital improvements of the Public Library which will raise an estimated $1,750,000 in the first year. A portion of the revenues received would be distributed to the Brownfield Redevelopment Authority and Kent County Land Bank. Shall this amendment be adopted?

 

▢ YES

▢ NO

Ballot Language Explained

added – In 1997, voters approved a library millage to renovate the Main Library and make improvements to branches, including building new branches. This millage expires in 2017. The library is asking voters to extend this millage for another 20 year but because the library will be using funds from the millage for operations instead of capital expenditures, it must be called a new tax. The “new” tax replaces the expiring levy from 1997, but for the same amount voters currently pay, 0.3741 mils.

taxable value – Taxable value is generally 1/2 the assessed value of a home. The average home value in Grand Rapids is $100,276 so that average taxable value is $50,138.

distributed – A portion of revenue funding the Grand Rapids Public Library is captured by TIFAs (Tax Incremented Financing Authorities). Tax increment finance districts capture tax revenues from the increased value or “increment,” created by new development. TIFAs are created and regulated by state government, but draw their funding from local taxes. GRPL is legally required to list all TIFAs on its ballot measure. The Grand Rapids Brownfield Redevelopment Authority (BRA) was established in 1996 to assist with the redevelopment of blighted or contaminated properties in the City. The Kent County Land Bank Authority (KCLBA) partners with local government, community groups, and private sector redevelopers to eliminate blight, increase property values, preserve neighborhood character and promote economic development.