1%? 99%? What are these numbers based on?

You’ve heard the rhetoric, but where do the numbers come from? Thanks to a (mostly) transparent government, the numbers are pretty readily available. Last month, for instance, the Congressional Budget Office reported the Trends in the Distribution of Household Income Between 1979 and 2007 and the numbers show income for the richest folks in America (the 1%) almost tripled, while everyone else’s (the 99%) stayed about the same.
What you do with the data is a whole other issue, but if you’re going to debate about it, it helps to have the numbers.

For this, and other goodies from the Federal government, try using the search engine USA.gov. And don’t forget that the Grand Rapids Public Library is a Federal Depository for government documents.

2 Responses to “1%? 99%? What are these numbers based on?”

  1. November 4, 2011 at 1:04 pm #

    "All other groups saw their shares decline by 2 to 3 percentage points."

  2. November 4, 2011 at 6:04 pm #

    “All other groups saw their shares decline by 2 to 3 percentage points.”